Got my Rift - Great but incomplete

TomekTomek Posts: 76
I got my rift and while it's very clear, and great with the spatial tracking, I am finding it is quite gimmicky. Apollo 11 was awesome although I have yet to try the EVE game which I think will be great. However, I want to play first person games. To play those though, I really feel that I need the Omni as it would spoil the adventure if I just sat here with my thumbsticks and nausea like I had to on the moon. I really hope the space and driving games are good enough but I can't see it comparing to actually walking around. The lack of hand controls is also crap as I often want to reach out and interact with things but I am just a floating camera.

I did realise that even with the Omni, it would be good to have teleportation or some kind of automatic walking as playing some games would be too tiring if you walk really far and long. In games we often run but there's no way we could even jog for very long while playing something like Skyrim.

Comments

  • gleamingsandsgleamingsands Posts: 306
    I agree, it is quite gimmicky, but don't fret, we'll have our Omnis and touch controllers.
    *sigh* It was kind of what I expected, but Dreamdeck was fun, and you know what, I genuinely enjoy into the dead. Try some other stuff, many of these games are pretty good.
    What's your Oculus screen name? You can be my first add. I'm FrazierDanger
  • TomekTomek Posts: 76
    Yeah i liked dream deck.. probably the most so far haha. Along with Apollo 11. That is good. The movies are ok too as they are truly 3D unlike their AVI counterparts on the GearVR.

    @gleamingsands Phroneo
  • gleamingsandsgleamingsands Posts: 306
    @Tomek That is really classy.
  • gleamingsandsgleamingsands Posts: 306
    @sutekiB I was wondering if you could could enlighten us as to how much better the experience gets with the Omni, ie just walking around. The nauseating feeling of wandering around in VR space, while I am definitely building a bit of tolerance, is something I hope is made better by the Omni. What say you? Night and day?
  • sutekiBsutekiB Posts: 1,069
    It's night and day @gleamingsands, I don't get any nausea from walking on the Omni. Before I had my Omni, I barely used my DK2 for that reason. But using your hands to walk isn't just sim-sickness inducing, it's immersion breaking, and less fun.

    BTW, now that I've paired it with a positionally tracked headset, the experience is even better. When you begin to walk IRL, your head usually moves before your feet, to shift your center of gravity in the direction you want to go. That slight forward motion was never picked up by headsets without positional tracking, and made the motion seem somewhat more jerky and abrupt. Now, as I hoped, moving off and coming to a halt feels even more natural and comfortable. This also brings forward and backwards latency to practically zero.

    Fortunately, vorpX has a Geometry 3D mode, so I am now playing Skyrim with positional head tracking! Admittedly, it's beta support. The frame rate is not as high as it should be, or the tracking latency as low, and head movement is not always 1:1, but it has really improved the experience for me. I've been busy tweaking the settings to try to squeeze every last frame I can get out of my 970, and once I've tested it a bit more I'll put out a video tutorial.
    Community Manager at Virtuix
  • Sponge101Sponge101 Posts: 477
    You guys are so lucky. I've never experience VR in any form so the totality of my thinking about VR is solely based on literature and vids. The point: motion sickness be damn. I'll keep a bucket next to me if I have to until my body adapt.

    @sutekiB. I'm assuming your testing it on the consumer PC for general applicability reasons but what about using it with your 980ti PC? Do you need more horsepower than even that card can provide? If not, I just read an article (could be wrong) that claims the 1080 will give a 50% performance increase over the 980ti. Will that bump in performance be enough to max everything and Geometry 3D?
  • sutekiBsutekiB Posts: 1,069
    edited May 2016
    @Sponge101 My first VR experience was on the Omni, almost three years ago - and that made me a believer. It's hard to have full confidence in something you haven't tried, so I admire your vision.

    I don't have access to the 980Ti anymore, as it belonged to a friend I was sharing an apartment with at the time. I chose the 970 so I could conduct tests to find the optimum settings for anyone who's getting into VR with an entry-level 'VR Ready' PC. It's a long process, hence the delay in my next video, but I've learned some useful things. For instance, vorpX has a virtual ambient light feature in edge-peek mode (basically a zoomed out view where your head moves independently of the picture). It may be more pleasant for watching a film, but I found that turning it off actually helped more with sim-sickness caused by cut-scenes, while at the same time giving me an extra 1-2 FPS. I also found that turning off the crystal image setting made the picture look smoother, and gave me another 1-2 FPS. May not sound like much, but in VR frame rate is very important.

    The 980Ti would allow for higher settings (I've had to reduce many to almost minimum for Geometry 3D to work), but for maximum settings you would need something more powerful. It seems like the 1080 would do it, and so I'd recommend that to anyone over the 970, especially given the price.

    I should say that however powerful your gpu, you may never get the same performance as a game made natively for VR. Those titles are optimized to get 90FPS, and still look great. However, it will be a while before we get open world games in VR, so if you can get Skyrim running at half that frame rate, you might find that is one of the most compelling experiences you can have in VR right now.
    Community Manager at Virtuix
  • gleamingsandsgleamingsands Posts: 306
    edited May 2016
    @Sponge101 I have to say, motion "sickness" is a misleading title. The most disconcerting effect of VR Sim sickness is not that you feel you might throw up, it's the disorientation associated with your eyes and ears telling you two different things. Your cochlea and other mechanisms in your inner ear are responsible for your balance, and these mechanisms are not being acted upon by any outside force apart from gravity, and I challenge anyone to attempt to do so; it would be impossible without the use of artificial filaments in your inner ear. Crabs, for instance, use grains of sand to act as the filamentation within their inner "ear." By emptying out these pockets and subsequently providing them only with metal shavings which are magnetically reactive to replace the sand with, and then providing a sufficiently powerful magnet, you can trick their senses into believing they must right themselves, resulting in a motion which is used to alleviate the stress being acted upon it by the force of the magnetic shavings within their inner ear. The crabs will literally topple themselves attempting to resolve their perceived vestibular impairment.

    Ignoring the possibility of simulated electro-stimulation of these organs to produce the desired result, this would be largely impossible for use in a human subject, however your eyes, which are also partly responsible for your vestibulary systems control of your balance so long as they are active, are capable of being acted upon by outside forces in a way that creates an outside perception which can be largely disassociated from what you may actually be feeling. When brought to any extreme, this process results in what we call sim sickness, which can last for hours. Its a very uncomfortable feeling, and often results in a feeling of exhaustion.
  • sutekiBsutekiB Posts: 1,069
    @gleamingsands I had not heard of that crab study - interesting. Some people call it a disconnect rather than sickness, but to me 'sickness' does describe the feeling quite accurately. It's like the lurch you get when traveling in a vehicle that accelerates unexpectedly. I think that's a side of it that doesn't get as much attention - the expectation. For instance, when I use the scroll wheel on my mouse, I expect the page to move. If it doesn't (say I only dabbed at the wheel, not enough to overcome its inertia), the lack of movement on screen can give me a similarly unpleasant feeling. And yet this has nothing to do with me physically moving relative to three dimensional space. It's more that I've physically enacted a change which I subconsciously expect to see reflected in motion in front of me. Somehow, this modern way of manipulating virtual environments taps into our inner motion sensing systems. It's pretty amazing, and just just shows adaptable we are, yet at the same time so intractably wired for survival.
    Community Manager at Virtuix
  • gleamingsandsgleamingsands Posts: 306
    @sutekiB Exactly. We are incredibly adaptable. Even in the short time I've been privileged to have a 1st gen consumer HMD, I've noticed that my sense of disconnect, as you called it, has diminished, at first remaining low level, then peaking, and now slowly waning as I continue to use the head set. Positional tracking is very important to this, however, as I don't believe anyone could ever get used to moving their head and not perceiving the proper admixture of movement and accustomed reflex reactions associated with those movements. Incidentally, I've noticed that my Rift, when the sensor is optimally positioned, is very good at this, but that when not optimally positioned, all it takes is the turn of the head to result in a temporary disconnect between the sensor and the minimum amount of sensor information necessary to maintain proper movement virtual movement relative to real time physical movement. I'm starting to consider the benefits of having a Vive more and more, and although I remain hopeful that Oculus will resolve the room scale positional tracking issue with a second camera sensor in the Oculus touch bundle, I hesitate to state as fervently as I once might have my faith that they can or will be able to meet user expectations.
  • sutekiBsutekiB Posts: 1,069
    It's amazing what you can get used to. I used the Omni without a positionally tracked headset for a long time and it didn't bother me that leaning forward had no effect - what you don't know you're missing doesn't bother you. We see that now in people who've never tried an Omni, and think it's an acceptable experience to constantly teleport around. Now that I have a 6DOF headset, going back to 3DOF feels noticeably bad. I suppose I could get used to it again, but I don't much want to. Kids growing up now with virtual reality may think it's hilarious that we used to game on TV screens and monitors - no 1:1 scale, no headtracking, and for the most part, no stereoscopic 3D. I also think they will look back at the assortment of comfort modes that were experimented with and think we were crazy for even considering them, since they'll all have Omnis. It will be considered cruel and neglectful to force your child to use VR without one :)

    (I'm feeling bold today, so I'm making bold statements)
    Community Manager at Virtuix
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